ABOUT AUTISM

“If you have seen one child with autism,
you have seen one child with autism.”


Understanding Autism Research and How to Use it to Advocate for Your Child

BY: Hanna Rue, PhD, BCBA-D

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Información general sobre el autismo

BY: Angela Montes

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The Premack Principle (or First: Then Rule), A Positive Reinforcement Strategy

BY: Chisato Komatsu

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ALL AUTISM TALK

Hosted By: Rob Haupt

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AUTISM SPECTRUM BLOG

Community Coming Together

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ALLAUTISMNEWS.COM

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INFORMATION AND RESEARCH


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THE BASICS

Autism is not a single, easily described disorder. In fact, there are unlimited ways in which a person with autism might be affected. The range of behaviors and challenges associated with autism is so wide that the term autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is used in order to encompass them all. 

Autism is not an intellectual disability, but it is possible for a person to have multiple disorders, meaning they could be diagnosed
with an intellectual disability and autism at the same time. With autism, overall intellectual ability, or IQ, can vary dramatically.


WHEN TO LOOK FOR SIGNS OF AUTISM


The onset of autism typically comes very early in childhood, and is often noticeable well before the child’s second birthday. A diagnosis of autism usually occurs before age three.
Two main areas of development are considered when diagnosing autism:

• Difficulties with social communication and social interaction
• Presence of behavioral issues including restricted, repetitive patterns or behavior, interests, or activities 

An early evaluation by a qualified professional is critical in order to get the correct diagnosis and to secure services appropriate for the child’s needs. A typical evaluation will include interviews with the parent(s), standardized assessments, and direct observation of the child.

WHO IS AFFECTED


Autism affects people of all racial, ethnic and socioeconomic groups. It is, however, more common in boys than in girls. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that about 1 in 68 children have autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

A HOPEFUL PROGNOSIS


Early intervention is critical to the long-term success of people with autism. Happily, there is much scientific evidence to support the positive effects achievable with many of today’s treatment programs.

With proper intervention and support, many children diagnosed with autism can grow to enjoy an active and productive life. Depending on an individual’s needs, symptoms and intervention, adulthood can mean a wide range of possibilities from assisted living to independent living and employment.  Following appropriate intervention, some people may no longer meet the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD).