SCHOOL FUNDING

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS


Understanding Autism Research and How to Use it to Advocate for Your Child

BY: Hanna Rue, PhD, BCBA-D

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InformaciĆ³n general sobre el autismo

BY: Angela Montes

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The Premack Principle (or First: Then Rule), A Positive Reinforcement Strategy

BY: Chisato Komatsu

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SCHOOL FUNDING

Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), school-aged children diagnosed with autism have a right to a Free and Appropriate Education (FAPE) in the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE).

What does this mean? As you can imagine, there are differing opinions about what is appropriate for a child with autism. In general, though, “appropriate” means that education programs must be designed to meet their individual needs to the same extent that the needs of non-disabled students are met. The supports and services should be provided in the general education setting to the extent possible.

The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Educational Interventions for Children with Autism recommends a minimum of 25 hours per week of intervention, adding, “The appropriate goals for educational services are the same as those for other children: personal independence and social responsibility.” (Lord and McGee, p.216) This 25-hour minimum is not only deemed critical but appropriate. 

Research shows that ABA intervention, occupational therapy (OT) and speech therapy are appropriate for children with autism. Work with your school district to find out what supports and services are appropriate for your child to create an Individual Education Program (IEP) that is right for your child.
Adapted from National Research Council (2001) Educating  Children with Autism. Committee on Educational Interventions  for Children with Autism. Catherine Lord and James P. McGee, eds.  Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education.  Washington, DC: National Academy Press.