How ABA Therapy Helped Our Children Succeed: Insights from Two BCBA Moms


In this informative video, two Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) moms, Heather and Trisha, share their personal experiences with Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy and how it has helped their children succeed. For more information about our ABA Therapy services, visit: https://lrnbvr.com/yt-aba-moms

Q&A About ABA Therapy for Children with Autism

FAQ for Caregivers

Was your child recently diagnosed with autism? Are you beginning to navigate treatment for your child? Before you get started, check out these FAQs about ABA therapy.

What is the goal of ABA therapy?

ABA therapy is designed to support autistic individuals and their families, achieve their identified goals, and improve their quality of life. ABA-based interventions are supported by decades of research and enhance social, communication, play, and adaptive skills. Services incorporate the needs and interests of the autistic individual and their caregiver(s). A behavior analyst delivers the ABA services with the help of behavior technicians, who often provide direct care to the autistic individual. Services are tailored to the individual’s unique needs, with their feedback, and evolve over time. Services for children may look quite different than services for adults, given the individuals’ needs differ over time.

What is “contemporary ABA” therapy?

At LEARN, we refer to our approach as “contemporary ABA.” It is an evolved approach to ABA therapy that promotes individualized treatment, naturalistic and play-based teaching, and is person-centered. LEARN provides a contemporary approach that acknowledges the evolution of ABA, values the individual and their family, and creates space for individuality. Practicing contemporary ABA therapy means that our behavior analysts deeply understand their responsibility to positively and meaningfully impact the lives of the individuals served.

How many hours of ABA therapy will my child receive?

Your child’s hours will be determined between you and your behavior analyst. Your behavior analyst recommends hours based on assessing your child’s needs, other therapies received, and your feedback as the parent/caregiver. Focused programs range from 10-25 hours per week, and comprehensive programs range from 30-40 hours weekly. At LEARN, we provide home-based, center-based, and community-based services, and you can reach out to your local clinical director to find out which services are available in your area. Check out this video to learn about the number of hours clinically recommended for your child.

Are your ABA therapy services individualized?

Absolutely! Each autistic person we serve is unique, and we believe that should be celebrated. Our goal is to promote individual interests and incorporate those into ABA therapy. Behavior analysts make individualized recommendations for services, including hours based on the child and customized goals that fit their needs. Behavior therapists receive training on how to understand the preferences of their clients and include those in sessions to make them fun, rewarding, and engaging.

How is neurodiversity integrated into your approach to ABA therapy?

Listening to the perspective of autistic folks has informed our approach to ABA therapy and led us to incorporate neurodiversity into our practice. Our goal is to elevate the autistic voices in our community, including the individuals we serve, our neurodivergent employees, and the greater neurodivergent community. We’re deeply committed to person-centered ABA therapy practices and promote assent-based care, meaning we validate the identities and experiences of neurodivergent folks and create space for autistic voices to be heard and upheld. Learn more about our commitment to neurodiversity here.

Will my child be required to do discrete trials and sit at a table?

Not all autistic folks benefit from discrete trials or table-top work. For example, a two-year-old child with lots of energy may benefit more from a play-based approach with the therapist sitting on the floor and embedding learning opportunities in play with their favorite toy. Behavior analysts overseeing the treatment plan take time to assess the individual’s needs and work collaboratively with the family to identify an approach to treatment that will work best for the child.

What if someone doesn’t want ABA therapy?

We understand that not everyone seeks ABA therapy, feels it’s the best fit, or perhaps, thinks it’s the right time to try. As with other medical services, the patient (along with their caregiver, if a child) has the right to decide when, if, and what treatment is right for them. Not all ABA therapy providers have the same approach, either, and LEARN supports a family’s right to choose a provider that meets their needs and is a good match for their treatment goals. We want families and our clients to be excited about services and encourage collaboration on our journey together.

Reviewed by Dr. Ashley Williams, PhD, LABA, BCBA-D, Sr. Clinical Director

To learn more about ABA, visit our website. You can also search our locations here.

How Neurodiverse Voices are Influencing the Evolution of ABA

Dr. Becky Thompson, Director of Clinical Services for the Wisconsin Early Autism Project (WEAP), and Reux Lennon, Non-binary member of both the LGBT and Autism community and Lead technician with WEAP join us to share their work on the Person-Centered ABA team and the Neurodivergent Advisory Committee.  Dr. Thompson leads LEARN’s Person-Centered ABA team, which is a group of clinical leaders within LEARN who are dedicated to compassionate and individualized ABA services. Reux shares how their work as one of the original members of the Neurodivergent Advisory Committee is creating change and including neurodivergent voices and perspectives.

For more information visit:

https://learnbehavioral.com/learnacademy/culture/neurodiversity

All Autism Talk (https://www.allautismtalk.com/) is sponsored by LEARN Behavioral (https://learnbehavioral.com/learnacademy).

LEARN’s Behavior Technician Training: Our Commitment to Excellence

LEARN recognizes the critical role that effective training plays in the success of any program or initiative. As a result, we have invested heavily in redesigning our Behavior Technician (BT) Training program to ensure that all our trainees receive the highest quality training possible. With nearly 5,000 BTs working on the front lines each day to provide contemporary ABA services to children with autism and their families, it is essential that our BT training is up-to-date, comprehensive, and effective.

In the fall of 2021, LEARN undertook a significant endeavor to revamp our BT training program, focusing on providing all trainees with a thorough understanding of the core principles of ABA. We collaborated with renowned experts from ABA Technologies to guide the redesign of our program, ensuring that it meets all the requirements for the Registered Behavior Technician® (RBT®) exam and that our BTs are fully prepared to deliver exceptional services to our clients. Additionally, our BTs receive individualized, client-focused training provided by supervisors once they are in the field.

Our commitment to using the most effective training methods and incorporating the latest evidence-based practices sets our BT training apart from similar programs.

Our program includes five core components:

Direct Instruction

We believe high-quality training requires a strategic and deliberate approach grounded in evidence-based practice. Our training approach is based on direct instruction, a method that emphasizes carefully developed instructional sequences using explicit teaching techniques. With direct instruction, our trainers provide our trainees with clear and concise guidance on how to master new skills and knowledge while ensuring they are fully engaged in the learning process.

But direct instruction is more than just an effective teaching method. It’s also a dynamic and fun training experience that motivates trainees to learn and achieve their goals. Using this approach, we create an engaging and supportive learning environment that encourages active participation and fosters a sense of community among our trainees.

Of course, to ensure that our trainers deliver the highest-quality training possible, we have invested heavily in their professional development. All of our trainers participate in extensive training in direct instruction and receive ongoing support and feedback regarding their use of training techniques. This ensures that our trainers are always up-to-date with the latest best practices in training and can provide our trainees with the most effective instruction possible. At LEARN, we’re committed to providing a world-class training experience that is both effective and enjoyable, and we believe that our approach to direct instruction is a key part of that commitment.

Preview of Impact

We understand that the workforce is constantly evolving, and many people are now seeking meaningful and rewarding employment. With this in mind, we designed our new BT training program to provide trainees with the skills and knowledge they need to make a positive impact on the lives of their clients and their families.

The LEARN BT training program emphasizes the importance of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and its ability to create lasting change in our clients’ lives. Trainees will hear directly from BTs who work in the field and have experienced firsthand the triumphs and victories of working with families. The majority of the training program focuses on learning how to use a variety of techniques and strategies used in ABA therapy and implement them effectively to achieve the best possible outcomes for their clients. Throughout the training program, trainees will have many opportunities to demonstrate their skills and receive feedback.

By emphasizing the impact that ABA can have on clients and their families, we aim to inspire our trainees to approach their work with a sense of purpose and dedication. By providing our trainees with the tools and knowledge they need to succeed, we can help them build rewarding and fulfilling careers that make a real difference in the lives of others.

Live, Small Group Instruction

We take great pride in our team of highly-motivated, dedicated, and skilled trainers to ensure the success of our trainees. Our trainers are not only experts in their fields but also possess a wealth of experience working with trainees from diverse backgrounds with varying experiences. They have an in-depth understanding of how to create an effective learning environment that is supportive, engaging, and personalized to meet the unique needs of each trainee.

To achieve this, we use a highly interactive and engaging training approach that emphasizes hands-on learning experiences. Conducted in small groups, our live training sessions allow our trainers to provide each trainee with individual attention, support, and feedback. This approach ensures that trainees can practice and apply their new skills and knowledge and receive immediate feedback on their progress.

DE&I Integration

We believe that diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) are essential to creating a positive and productive work environment. We understand that a diverse workforce not only brings unique perspectives and experiences but also fosters creativity, innovation, and growth. That’s why we’re committed to supporting robust DEI initiatives that enable all employees to feel valued, supported, and empowered.

Our approach involves facilitating access to various resources, affinity groups, and training programs that promote DEI in the workplace. These initiatives include regular workshops and training sessions designed to help employees better understand DEI issues and learn how to apply best practices in their day-to-day work. Our trainers highlight the importance of DEI initiatives and encourage active participation from all employees.

Moreover, we believe that DEI initiatives are not just a box-ticking exercise but a fundamental aspect of our organizational culture. We recognize that fostering a culture of diversity, equity, and inclusion requires ongoing commitment, engagement, and action from everyone in our organization. As such, we encourage all employees to actively promote DEI and share their experiences, ideas, and perspectives with others.

Child Development & Play Training

At LEARN, we take pride in serving a diverse age range of clients, specifically young children. We recognize children are naturally curious and playful and that play is essential to their development. As such, we prioritize training our staff to engage children in meaningful and developmentally-appropriate play activities. We designed our training program to provide staff with the skills and knowledge they need to facilitate play-based learning experiences that are both fun and educational. We cover many topics, from the basics of child development to the latest approaches in naturalistic teaching. Our trainers work closely with staff to ensure they have a deep understanding of how to play with children at different developmental levels and tailor activities to meet each child’s unique needs and interests. By investing in our staff and providing them with the tools they need to succeed, we provide high-quality care to the young autistic children we serve.

Within LEARN, we’re committed to providing our trainees with the knowledge, skills, and resources they need to succeed in their careers. Our BT training program is just the beginning of a lifelong journey of learning and professional growth. We believe that ongoing education and skill development are essential for staying competitive in today’s fast-paced and constantly evolving job market.

That’s why we offer a range of advanced training programs, workshops, and continuing education courses that enable our trainees to deepen their knowledge and stay up-to-date with the latest best practices in their field. We’re dedicated to supporting career advancement and providing our trainees with the resources and guidance they need to achieve their professional goals.

Whether you’re just starting your career or looking to take the next step, LEARN is here to support you every step of the way. We’re committed to providing a world-class training experience that empowers our trainees to achieve their full potential and positively impact their communities.

Interested in working with us? Search our careers here: https://learnbehavioral.com/careers

To learn more about working as a BT, read “What in the World Is a Behavior Tech?” and check out our “Top 5 Reasons to Become a Behavior Tech.”

Celebrating Women in Autism this International Women’s Day

For decades, women have played a crucial role in diagnosing, understanding, and treating autism spectrum disorder (ASD). As ASD becomes more prevalent, women continue to be instrumental in developing and refining treatment through vast areas of research. There is much to be recognized, not only for women’s incredible contributions to the autism field but also for their experiences living on the spectrum.  

In honor of International Women’s Day, check out our top five All Autism Talk podcast episodes featuring notable women.  

1. Dr. Temple Grandin – Navigating Autism

2. Dr. Ronit Molko- Girls and Autism: Diagnosis, Treatment, and New Research

3. Devon Sundberg- Women in Behavior Analysis

4. Jennifer Cook- Female Life on the Spectrum

5. Adrienne Bradley- Race and How it Impacts ABA and Our Community

All Autism Talk is a leading autism podcast that offers friendly conversation with inspiring individuals in the autism community. To learn more about All Autism Talk, please visit https://www.allautismtalk.com/  

Successful Models for Assent-Based Vaccine Clinics

Kerry Hoops the current President of the Autism Society of Greater Wisconsin and the clinical director for Wisconsin Early Autism Project’s Green Bay region joins us to share about a unique clinic event and what can be learned. Kerry shares details of sensory-friendly covid vaccine events that utilized assent-based practice to create a comfortable experience for children. As Kerry put it, “When it was time for the shot, that was determined by the child. We were very open and honest with the child and let them know it would only happen when they said it was ok.” 

5 Tips for Navigating Autism Treatment for Your Multilingual Child

Maia Jackson, M.S., BCBA
Clinical Development Manager, LEARN Behavioral

Language development is a critical component of the day-to-day lives of young children. It is used within a variety of contexts, including playing with peers, building relationships, functionally communicating needs, etc. As such, there is a heavy emphasis on language and communication built into most applied behavior analytic (ABA) programs. Because such a heavy emphasis is placed on language, it is important that practitioners are mindful of the specific language or languages that are incorporated in the therapeutic setting. In order for ABA programs to be socially significant, services should represent and accommodate for the dominant language of the family. By doing so, children and their families will experience a variety of benefits.

By promoting the use of the family’s native language, children have an increased likelihood of communication opportunities with their immediate and extended families, friends, and community. In addition to having more opportunities to communicate, the quality of the interactions will be more meaningful as caregivers are more likely to effectively express their own emotions, hold their child’s attention, and more thoroughly discuss topics of interest when using their native language (Zhou, et al., 2019). There are also benefits to multilingualism outside of the familial unit. Research has shown that children who are raised in multilingual homes tend to demonstrate higher perspective talking skills than children who do not (Zhou, et al., 2019). Despite all of the benefits to speaking one’s native language, families often face a number of barriers, especially when seeking out autism-related services.

While we live in a culturally diverse country, English remains the dominant language in most regions of the U.S. When children turn on the TV, chances are the shows they watch are in English. When they go to school, they will receive a primarily English education and their peers will speak primarily English. Autistic individuals who receive behavior analytic treatment in the U.S. are likely receiving those services in English. Despite all of these barriers, there are ways for parents and caregivers to advocate for their bilingual children and family.

1. Look for providers who speak your native language

One of the first measures to take when selecting a service provider is to request clinicians who speak your native language. Bilingual service providers can be hard to find and it may take time, but let your provider know your preference so they can attempt to hire and/or pair you with appropriate staff members.

2. Request translation services.

In cases where there are no staff members available to provide services in your native language, consider asking for translation services. Even if you are proficient in English, it may be easier or feel more comfortable for you to communicate in your native language. Per the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s (BACB) Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts, the clinician you are working with should make every effort to effectively communicate with you and provide you with the opportunity to ask questions and participate in the development and implementation of your child’s program.

3. Consider the assessment language.

If your child speaks a language other than English, it is important to discuss the benefits of your child being assessed in that language. Providers use assessment results as a tool to guide the clinical program and decision making. Having the results of the assessment in your child’s primary or dominant languages will give a more accurate picture of your child’s strengths and areas of need. The starting point of the program will be more representative of your child’s language abilities.


4. Ensure the program is visually representative of your child and your family.

Visual tools and stimuli are often used as prompts, supports, and/or reinforcement systems within many ABA programs. These visual supports may serve to outline a schedule for the day, visuals might accompany a short narrative or story describing a social scenario your child might encounter, or you might see visual images used as reminders or prompts of what steps come next in routine with multiple steps, such as hand washing.  These visual items should be representative of your child and your family. Discuss incorporating your native language and culture into these items in order to promote their use and acceptance by your child. If your child accepts the stimuli and is motivated to use them, effectiveness of their intended purpose will likely increase. 

5. Discuss your language and other cultural values with your team.

Per the Ethical Code for Behavior Analysts, your cultural norms, traditions, and expectations should be extended through all aspects of the ABA program. Social interactions, communication, play activities, and activities of daily living are areas that are addressed in many ABA programs and are going to be affected by language, culture, and traditions. Discussing the ways your language and culture impact your day-to-day routines and expectations will help the clinical team develop and implement a program that is best suited to your child and your family.  

Serving as the navigator and advocator of your child’s services is a huge role. Advocating for language will often be just as important as advocating for hours, goals, or other supports.  Use your team to provide support and to feel empowered to be the advocate your child and your family need.

Supports at LEARN:

  • Document translation services
  • Translation services
  • Language Resource Library
  • Staff training and tools related to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Zhou, A., Munson, J.A., Greenson, J., Jou, Y., Rogers, S., Estes A.M. (2019). An exploratory longitudinal study of social language outcomes in children with autism in bilingual home environments. Autism, 23(2), 394-304.

3 Tips for Making Valentine’s Day Special for Your Autistic Child


As store shelves turn to masses of pink and red, some people get excited and others groan. Valentine’s Day, with all of its joy and complexities, is around the corner. Although love and social connection are important to everyone, Valentine’s Day can be tricky to navigate for many people, including some of our autistic loved ones. Different ages bring different challenges: from the drama of classroom valentine exchanges to the heart-stopping anxiety of having a date. Wherever your child may fall on this continuum of V-Day Life Lessons, a few considerations can help them feel cherished on this day. 

Prepare

Consider the potential challenges that your child might encounter that could be helped by some advance skill-building. Think carefully about what your child will encounter that day and what easily-acquired skills might help them enjoy the day more. A younger child whose class is exchanging valentines might benefit from practice; find out how the teacher will approach this (will the kids deposit them into a box or hand them out individually?) and rehearse in advance. A teen attending a dance might benefit from a social story about what to expect, previewing conversation starters, and maybe watching some realistic shows depicting teen dances to help set expectations. If anxiety is a factor (as it can be with anyone of any age!), make sure there is an easy way for them to contact you for an early pick-up. For safety, teens and young adults who are dating should have information about consent and sexual harassment at a level they can understand. Learning about good hygiene practices, manners, and general dating “dos and don’ts” can help to set them up for success.    

Accommodate

There will also be challenges on Valentine’s Day that can’t be solved by skill-building. Consider your child’s experience and be creative about the types of accommodations that might help them enjoy the day the most. If your child is on a special diet, find out if there will be school treats so you can arrange for something yummy for your little one. Some children will not enjoy the “typical” Valentine’s Day activities. Remember, it’s once a year, don’t stress over making them go to a class party they won’t enjoy. There may be accommodations that can help make regular activities okay (headphones), or you can simply ditch the regular valentines’ stuff and think of some fun alternatives instead. Perhaps instead of going to the dance, they can rather invite a friend over to bake brownies or watch a movie with their sibling.    

Love

Valentine’s Day is an opportunity to show others how much you care. As a parent or caregiver, showing affection for our children is one of the most fulfilling experiences. Think about your child’s preferences and give them a token of your love, whether that be treats, attention, a new Lego set, or a special rock. Giving them choices in preparing for the day (e.g., picking out valentines, choosing a special dessert, etc.), thinking about how to include their preferred interests in your plans, and making plans to accommodate sensory needs can communicate your love and respect.    

Some profoundly affected autistic folks will not be affected by the fact the world has turned pink and red; they may not understand or care. But this doesn’t prevent them from receiving your love and affection in the ways they do the rest of the year, so take the opportunity to connect with them on their level. Many autistic folks tend to anthropomorphize; if there are things (e.g., trains, books, electronic devices, etc.) that are the object of your child’s affection, think about how to celebrate these objects that give your child joy. 

For those autistic children who understand the social nuances of Valentine’s Day, it can create pressure around feelings of popularity and acceptance. If your child is experiencing these common hardships, do your best to shift the emphasis away from romantic love and toward other satisfying relationships in your child’s life. For some, that may be a friend, or for others, it may be family. Reassurance that they are accepted at home and loved unconditionally is paramount. 

Have Happy Valentine’s Day!

Last but not least: show yourself some love as well. Parenting isn’t easy and requires many qualities, including patience, empathy, and, most importantly, love. The love we give our children isn’t always returned in the moment, making it hard sometimes to reflect on all the wonderful things you do for your child. Remember, you’re raising a human, which is stressful yet important and incredible work. As you nurture your relationship with your child, you build their capacity to love and show love to others. This Valentine’s Day, take some credit for all you do for your child in the name of love and find a way to treat yourself, whether that means setting aside time to read or exercise, getting an extra hour of sleep, or calling a friend. You deserve just as much love on this special day.    

For research-backed strategies on managing stress, check out “How Parents and Caregivers of Kids with Autism Cope with Stress.” To dive deeper into the topic of love and autism, learn more at “Myth: People with Autism Don’t Feel Love.”

Myth: Autistic People Lack Empathy

Katherine Johnson. M.S., BCBA
Senior Director of Partnerships, LEARN Behavioral

Note: This article is about a form of ableism that affects one part of the autistic community: autistic people who are proficient verbal communicators. Those who communicate with AAC devices, typing, sign, or who don’t yet have the communication skills to engage with the wider world face other forms of ableism and discrimination not described in this article. 

The Double Empathy Problem

Remember the game “telephone”? One person whispers a message to another, that person whispers to the next, and on down the line until the last person announces the message so everyone can laugh at how many times the original sentence has been distorted. 

Using a variation of this exercise, a study looked at how a message fared if the string of people in the telephone line were all autistic, all neurotypical, or a mix of both. It turns out that the rate at which the message degraded among the verbal autistic people was no greater than that of the neurotypical people.  It was only when the message was sent through a mix of autistic and neurotypical people that the meaning deteriorated significantly faster. 

What does this tell us? 

If effective social communication was objectively deficient (not just different) in verbal autistic people, we would expect that the all-autistic string of people would produce the worst decline in messages in the study; that wasn’t the finding. Instead, the autistic people received and passed along messages amongst themselves just as well as the neurotypical people. The faulty communication resulted not from the autistic participants but from the mismatch between autistic and neurotypical communication.  

This small study illustrates a theory by Dr. Damian Milton that he calls the “double empathy problem.” Challenging the assumption that neurotypical people have social skills that autistic people simply lack, he posits that the disconnects between autistic and non-autistic people are not the result of a one-sided skill deficit; they are instead a mismatch of neurotypes.

Reframing

This is a dramatic reframing of the common belief about these communication breakdowns, which placed the fault squarely on the social skill profile of the autistic folks. The “empathy” part of the theory’s name refers to the widely-held idea that autistic people lack empathy, when the theory would suggest that autistic empathy is simply expressed differently. Slowly but surely, researchers are beginning to look at that other side of the coin: how the social skill profiles of neurotypical people might also undermine relationships.   

For years, research has demonstrated that autistic people have difficulty interpreting facial expressions; a 2016 study finally looked at the reverse. They asked neurotypical people to interpret facial expressions of autistic folks – and they were unable to do it. The results of a series of studies in 2017 suggest that one reason people of different neurotypes have difficulty connecting is because neurotypical people form negative first impressions of autistic people (based upon appearance, not conversational skills), and subsequently avoid them. This indicates that some of the social isolation that autistic people face is due to ableism and discrimination.  

Missing Out

The difficulties autistic and non-autistic people have connecting negatively impact both sides. Since autistic people are in the minority, disconnection from the neurotypical portion of their community can increase their feelings of loneliness and isolation. For its part, the neurotypical world is missing out on the unique, often innovative, autistic perspective. 

Autistic people who have had huge cultural impacts on our society (environmental activist Greta Thunberg, actor Dan Akroyd, and Pokemon creator Santoshi Tajiri, to name a few) have had success in spite of a society that is largely unsupportive of and, at times, openly hostile to, the social profile of autistic folks. Imagine what brilliance we miss out on when autistic people are looked over, avoided, not hired, etc.  

Even those who are not destined to become one of the famous few mentioned above have a perspective that can deeply impact those around them. Autistic people see the world from different angles, which can be an advantage in everyday problem-solving. They generally have a strong sense of justice, an unwillingness to be cowed by hierarchy, and a drive for honesty, sincerity, and specificity, all beneficial qualities in social relationships and the workplace.

Expanding Neurotypical Empathy

The solution to the separation between people of different neurotypes has largely been to teach autistic people how to understand the rest of the world better. But by considering the double-empathy problem, we can see that this is only part of the issue. The other part is that non-autistic people also have skill deficits: interpreting and interacting with autistic people. 

Just as history is written by the winners, social norms are written by the majority. If we want to work toward a future where people of all neurotypes better understand one another, we must listen to the experiences of the minority. It’s important to recognize that neurotypical “social norms” exist because they’re most common, not because they are inherently superior. These dominant “social norms” directly result from how neurotypical people think, behave, and process the world. 

“Empathy” is about understanding another person’s experience. Ironically, to succeed in our society, autistic people must display empathy nearly constantly: decoding others’ unwritten rules and learning to approach the world in a way that works for others. To bridge the divide, nurture the gifts of the autistic people in our society, and for everyone to benefit from the valuable perspectives of the neurodivergent, those with neurotypical brains must follow this example. By challenging themselves to work toward understanding and adapting to the way autistic people see and experience the world, neurotypical folks can open themselves up to new friends with an intense devotion to honesty. Employers will find innovative autistic employees with rare specializations and a knack for accuracy. And society will benefit from recognizing and celebrating the valuable and previously underappreciated gifts of the autistic mind. 

Damian E.M. Milton (2012) On the ontological status of autism: the ‘double empathy problem’, Disability & Society, 27:6, 883-887, DOI: 10.1080/09687599.2012.710008

Sheppard, E., Pillai, D., Wong, G.TL. et al. How Easy is it to Read the Minds of People with Autism Spectrum Disorder?. J Autism Dev Disord 46, 1247–1254 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2662-8

Sasson, N., Faso, D., Nugent, J. et al. Neurotypical Peers are Less Willing to Interact with Those with Autism based on Thin Slice Judgments. Sci Rep 7, 40700 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/srep40700